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2 edition of Age and interference in visuospatial working memory. found in the catalog.

Age and interference in visuospatial working memory.

Gillian Rowe

Age and interference in visuospatial working memory.

by Gillian Rowe

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Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

Two experiments considered the possibility that age differences in VSWM span are due, in part, to older adults" susceptibility to interference. Older and younger participants were tested under conditions of either high or low interference, using two different displays; computerized versions of a 3 x 3 matrix, and the standard Corsi block task (CBT). We found that age differences in VSWM estimates were reduced in the low-interference condition. An additional finding was that males outperformed females, but only among young adults, and only in the CBT condition. A third experiment comparing the two displays replicated these gender findings. Our results suggest that: (1) Older adults" VSWM can be improved by reducing the amount of interference. (2) Typical WM span tasks may have a number of opposing components that differentially affect younger and older adults. (3) Gender differences in VSWM span appear to be task specific, and may decrease with age.

The Physical Object
Pagination48 p.
Number of Pages48
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19512921M
ISBN 100612955753

  Hitch, G.J. () Working Memory Psychological Medic ; Hitch, G.J. & Baddely, A.D. () Verbal reasoning and working memory Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychol ; Hole, G.J. () Decay and interference effects in visuospatial short-term memory Percept stract shapes requires visuospatial working memory is predictedthat in Study1 monitoringa face willinterfere with children’s abilitiesto decodedescrip-tionsof abstract shapes. 2. Processing faces and decoding descriptions of ab-stract shapes will carry visuospatial working memory ,however,predictedCited by:

working memory components are in place by 4 years of age. The term working memory refers to the capacity to store and manipulate information over brief periods of time (Baddeley & Hitch, ; Just & Carpenter, ). Extensive research over the past three decades has established that working memory is .   Attention and visuospatial working memory (VWM) share very similar characteristics; both have the same upper bound of about four items in capacity and they recruit overlapping brain regions. We examined whether both attention and VWM share the same processing resources using a novel dual-task costs approach based on a load-varying dual-task by:

  We set an accuracy criterion of 85% correct responses for the average of the verbal and visuospatial baseline conditions. This removed 3 younger adults and 7 older adults from the analysis, leaving 26 younger and 22 older adults in the sample. None of the participants in Cited by: Table of Contents. E. Kemps, Effects of Complexity on Visuo-spatial Working Memory.L. Pelizzon, M.A. Brandimonte, A. Favretto, Imagery and Recognition: Dissociable Measures of Memory?T. Vecchi, C. Cornoldi, Passive Storage and Active Manipulation in Visuo-spatial Working Memory: Further Evidence From The Study of Age Differences.J.G. Quinn, J. McConnell, Manipulation of Interference in the.


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Age and interference in visuospatial working memory by Gillian Rowe Download PDF EPUB FB2

Of a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) task (Rowe, Hasher, & Turcotte, ). Although reversing the presentation of set sizes reduces the amount of PI in WM span tasks and enhances older adults performance, it is unlikely that this manipulation addresses all potential sources of interference.

In particular, another source ofFile Size: KB. The authors investigated the possibility that working memory span tasks are influenced by interference and that interference contributes to the correlation between span and other measures.

In two visuospatial working memory (VSWM) span experiments, older and young participants were tested under conditions of either high or low interference, using two different displays: computerized. The current study examined the benefit of reducing proactive interference in verbal and visuospatial working memory tasks in young (25–30 years), young–old (65–75 years), and old–old (older than 75 years) by: Age differences in proactive interference in verbal and visuospatial working memory.

Laurentian University. In two visuospatial working memory (VSWM) span experiments, older and young participants were tested under conditions of either high or low interference, using two different displays: computerized versions of a 3 3 matrix or the standard (randomly arrayed) Corsi block task (P.

Corsi, ). The positive correlation between visuospatial working-memory capacity and mean motor chunk length that we observed suggests that older adults were able to use their working memory during learning. Awh et al. () argued that mean working-memory capacity represents a fixed number of items that people can hold in short-term working memory Cited by: Akira Miyake's Publications page.

Publications Books. Miyake, A., & Shah, P. (Eds.) ().Models of working memory: Mechanisms of active maintenance and executive.

Visuospatial working memory interference with recollections of trauma. Lilley SA., Andrade J., Turpin G., Sabin-Farrell R., Holmes EA. OBJECTIVES: Laboratory research using a working memory framework has shown modality-specific reductions in image vividness and emotionality when concurrent tasks are performed while maintaining the image in Cited by: Age differences in visuospatial working memory.

Memory updating is the ability to select and update relevant information and suppress no-longer-relevant data. The few studies in this area, targeting mainly the verbal domain, have investigated and confirmed an age-related decline in working memory updating ability (De Beni & Palladino, ; Van der Linden, Bredart, & Beerten, ).Cited by: This book is an excellent overview of a modern, current reseach on visuao-spatial congition, mental imagery and spatial abilities.

It is the long avaited overview of the current European perspectives on the topics. The book is a must have for researchers interested in mental imagery and individual differences in visuo-spatial by: Visuospatial working memory and mental representations of spatial descriptions Pazzaglia F., De Beni R.

Article published in the «European Journal of Cognitive Psychology» — — 17 (1) — pp. The purpose of the present research is to investigate whether different components of working memory (WM) are involved in processing. A second aim was to investigate whether visuo-spatial short-term memory tasks draw more on ex-ecutive resources than verbal short-term memory ones (e.g., Miyake et al., ; Shah & Miyake, ).

These data from adult samples indicate that there may be a common visuospatial construct that in-cludes both short-term and working memory tasks.

Interference and apperception in chess 89 subjects. Two of the positions were presented without any secondary task, two of the positions were given with an auditory secondary task in which subjects heard a series of the words "white", and "black" through headphones at Cited by: a.

most people can transfer seven digits into long-term memory instantly, bypassing short-term memory. the short-term memory capacity of most people is between five and nine units of digits.

sensory memory for numbers is very expansive and can handle such large quantities of digits. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): In two visuospatial working memory (VSWM) span experiments, older and young participants were tested under conditions of either high or low interference, using two different displays: computerized versions of a 3 3 matrix or the standard (randomly arrayed) Corsi block task (P.

Corsi, ). Abstract. In two visuospatial working memory (VSWM) span experiments, older and young participants were tested under conditions of either high or low interference, using two different displays: computerized versions of a 3 3 matrix or the standard (randomly arrayed) Corsi block task Cited by: Objective: Older adults ’ performance on working memory (WM) span tasks is known to be negatively affected by the buildup of proactive interference (PI) across trials.

PI has been reduced in verbal tasks and performance increased by presenting distinctive items across trials. Working memory (WM) declines with age.

However it seems unclear, whether age related decline is more pronounced on verbal WM or on visuo-spatial WM. The present study compares the effect of aging on verbal and visuo-spatial modality of WM on native Hindi healthy speakers, in the age range of to Cited by: 9.

An age-related improvement has been reported in the performance of a variety of frontal lobe-dependent tasks including working memory, susceptibility to interference, and inhibition of inappropriate responses (Hale et al. ; Luciana and Nelson ; Luna et al.

;Bunge et al. ).Despite this, few books on imagery refer to the concept of working memory in any detail, or specify the nature of the working memory system that might be involved in mental imagery.

This essay follows a line of reconciliation and positive critiquing in exploring the possible overlap between mental imagery and working by: Working memory is vulnerable to age-related decline, but there is debate regarding the age-sensitivity of different forms of spatial-sequential working memory task, depending on their passive or active nature.

The functional architecture of spatial working memory was therefore explored in younger (18–40 years) and older (64–85 years) adults, using passive and active recall by: 5.